History Of Crochet
Crochet

The History Of Crochet And Who Invented Crochet

Where does the word Crochet come from?
The word crochet comes from the old French word crochet, meaning 'little hook. "Which in turn is from croche.

Croche comes from the Germanic word croc. Both mean hook.

Crochetage means a single stitch used to join separate pieces of lace together. People used this term in French lace making in the 1600s.

When did Crochet first start?
Crochet was first called crochet in the mid-1800s.

In the early 1700s, where tambouring came to Europe after spreading through India, Persia, North America and Turkey, the method changed.

The background cloth used for tambouring was eliminated. The French called the new technique, "crochet in the air."

In the early 1800s, shepherd's cloth was produced, along with the shepherd's hook. It is thicker than a modern crochet hook but still with a hooked end.

In the mid-1800s, it became known as crochet or slip stitch crochet. In the 1960s, the granny square and crocheted home goods appeared and became more popular.

The earliest known published crochet pattern was in a Dutch magazine called Penélopé, in 1823. It listed instructions for five types of purses. Crochet is a wonderful hobby. You probably sit down to crochet whenever you have free time, but have you ever thought about how crochet originated?

If you are interested in knowing more about the history of crochet, you've come to the right place.

What does crochet mean? Where did crochet come from? Who invented it? Who was the first to create a crochet hook? I answer all these questions and more in this article. I will delve into the rich history of crochet. Which came first, knitting or crochet?
Knitting. Crochet came last in Nålebinding, knitting and crochet. The technique called Nålebinding came long before knitting or crochet. The history of crochet is much shorter than the other two, but just as fascinating.

Nålebinding is Danish, which means "to bind with a needle" or "to bind with a needle".' The women of the Nanti Tribe (an indigenous people of the Camisea region of Peru) still practice it.

The technique also remains popular in Scandinavia and the Balkans.

Nålebinding can be confused with knitting, but modern knitting began in the early 11th century, with ancient Egyptian socks.

After knitting, the word crochet first appeared in 1823 in the Dutch magazine Penélopé.

Who invented Crochet?
It is difficult to narrow down the origins and who invented it. The most reliable link to someone or people who developed crochet is through a unique Chinese embroidery technique or the French method 'tambouring.'

A French woman born in 1829 named Mademoiselle Riego de la Branchardiere wrote the first crochet pattern. She also wrote and published several books on crochet and knitting.

Although Mademoiselle Riego de la Branchardiere was French, she is credited for the invention of Irish crochet. It went on to become a prevalent method of crochet and remains so today. (See below).

A diary entry written by Elizabeth Grant, in The Memoirs of a Highland Lady (1797-1830), refers to shepherd's crochet.

It is the art of making garments made of cloth by making a rope/thread with a hook. More about shepherd's knitting further down in the post.

Irish crochet and the great Irish famine.
Due to terrible poverty, the Irish needed a way to earn money. Irish crochet lace was a great answer. Introduced to Ireland because of the Great Irish Famine (1845-1849), the Irish used it as a famine relief.

Developed in the mid-1800s in Ireland, Irish crochet or Irish crochet lace imitated Venetian knitted laces, which were expensive. Irish crochet lace is a style of Irish lace. The new method was a cheaper way to make money.

Teachers were taught the craft and began teaching young people to crochet in schools. They were sent out to show their knowledge to others. About 16,000 women were crocheting lace in 1851.

The process of making Irish crochet
Traditionally made with a fine steel hook and crochet linen thread, it is produced by crocheting separate lace motifs.

When you're done, you assemble them into a cloth that is the shape and outline of the design. Then, you baste it all together (sew with yarn for short tacking).

Next, you baste the motifs together with picots and chain stitches. Then you remove the basting stitches. Modern Irish crochet is with mercerized yarn instead of a crocheted linen yarn.

Irish lace
Irish lace is believed to be related to crochet.

Lady Arabella Denny, an Irish aristocrat, helped promote Irish lace with her extensive connections. Thanks to her and other upper-class Irish citizens, Irish lace made sales abroad.

Queen Victoria gives crochet a boost
Since Irish crochet was an inexpensive way to make lace, the higher class of society in early Victorian Britain considered it 'beneath them.'

To make crochet more fashionable, Queen Victoria bought Irish crochet lace from women in Ireland who were desperately trying to earn money.

She learned to knit and produced eight crocheted scarves. She gave each one to veterans of the South African war. Her efforts certainly gave crochet a boost in popularity!

Crochet History - A Timeline
1812 - A book called The Memoirs of a Highland Lady by Elizabeth Grant is published. In her writing, she talks about "shepherds knitting," essentially known today as slip stitch crochet. Shepherds knitting was and still is a version of crochet.

1823 - The first crochet pattern is published in a Dutch magazine called Penélopé, with instructions for coin purses.

1835 - The first patterns for crocheted purses were published in Germany and the Netherlands in many magazines. At this time, the patterns introduced two more stitches to create variance in the designs, single and double crochet.

1844 - The mercerizing process is invented. This is a process added to the manufacture of cotton to make it stronger and more durable. This means it becomes much easier to crochet with and becomes a more popular fiber of choice.

1846 - In the UK, magazines begin to publish patterns on how to make Spanish needle lace. The method of crocheting also changed. Instead of just working through the loop again, and the yarn cut at the end of each row. Sample working both, and the rows worked back and forth and then turned. The new method was similar to crochet today.

The late 1840s - As discussed in this post, the Irish crochet lace method of lace is produced. It becomes a way for impoverished people to earn money in The Great Irish Potato Famine.

The 1850s and 1860s - Due to the industrial revolution, things became mass produced and cheaper to buy. This includes crochet hooks. It also leads to many middle and upper class women having more free time. This means that more and more crochet is becoming popular as a hobby.

1867 - The very popular, and still running to this day, fashion magazine Harper's Bazaar is founded.

1910-1920 - Due to the Edwardian period in the UK, fashion changes and becomes more detailed. Popular crochet clothing styles change to reflect this.

World Wars - Governments encourage women to contribute to the war effort and crochet items for troops and soldiers in need.

After the wars - With restrictions on textiles lifted, crochet is rediscovered as a hobby. It becomes much more popular, as do other fiber arts.

1960s & 1970s - Possibly due to hippie and other alternative subcultures, crocheted items become very fashionable, particularly those made with granny squares.

1994 - Gwen Blakley Kinsler founded the Crochet Guild of America. Her goal was to encourage people from all over the United States to discover the enjoyable hobby of crochet.

2007 - Ravelry, the knitting, crochet and fiber arts forum, is created. Crochet and social media merge, becoming very popular and causing the creation of crochet blogs and communities.
The crochet hook
The modern crochet hook is closely related to a drum needle and the shepherd's hook.

When was the crochet hook invented?
Some crochet hooks have survived since the 19th century. In 1917 America, the Boye Needle Co. manufactured the first set of American crochet hooks. In 1923, the first aluminum hooks appeared.

What are crochet hooks made of?
Past crochet hooks have been made from many materials. Ivory, bone, porcupine quill and other unique materials.

Modern crochet hooks are made of bamboo, aluminum, plastic and glass. In addition, handcrafted hooks are made from materials such as particular types of wood.

Some also have grips to make it easier to crochet longer, and generally for comfort. When did Crochet Become Popular?
First in the late 1800s when Queen Victoria gave Irish crochet a boost during the great Irish famine.

In the 1920s and 1930s, the public decided that crochet was not just a way to make pretty decorations, but a way to make clothing and accessories.

Crochet flourished in the 1940s when it became a significant part of the British and American war effort.

The granny square and crochet household items are becoming increasingly fashionable today. What is crochet made of?
Crochet is made of yarn, which is knotted and stitched in unpredictable ways to create a crocheted piece of fabric.

The stitches or knots are made with a single hook. The yarn can be made from all sorts of different fibers, from acrylic to wool to bamboo.
What are the different types of crochet?
There are many types of crochet, but here is a list of some of the most common or popular ones.

Tunisia Crochet - One of the most well-known and popular subset types of crochet. It uses a very long crochet needle called a Tunisian crochet needle. It is very similar to knitting. You have many working loops at once instead of just one. You also work your loops on and off the hook. It produces a result that resembles knitting but is still unique.

Amigurumi Crochet - Created in Japan, this is an art form of creating stuffed creatures or toys with crochet or knitting. The word comes from two Japanese words. Ami means crochet or knitting, and nuigurumi means stuffed doll or toy.
Micro Crochet - Developed in modern times, it's true of the name when they say micro! Small, intricate designs, often lacy, uses very fine crochet thread, and the hooks used are some of the thinnest available. It is very delicate, time consuming and requires a steady hand and lots of patience, but the results are stunning.
Finger Crochet -The crochet form of finger crochet. You crochet, but instead of using a hook, you use your fingers. It boils down to a hand knitting method, but the knitting is done crochet stitch style. It's fun, but not suitable for complicated projects or projects that need tight tension.
Tapestry crochet - Essentially an umbrella term for almost crochet colorwork technique. Also known as intarsia crochet, and a variety of other different names.

There are many different ways and styles of doing colorwork, and each produces a different look. However, many other different colorwork methods do not fall into this category.
Aran Crochet - Aran in crochet means two different things. A crochet method and yarn weight. The technique is of Celtic origin and is made up of interlocking wires.

Also known as cabled or ribbed crochet. The resulting project is very bulky or chunky, making it perfect for winter garments and blankets.
Crochet Symbol - It can be any type or method of crochet. Still, instead of the written pattern, it is presented in a chart with symbols.

It is used to communicate complex or complicated designs, or sometimes so you don't have to understand a certain language to use it. Knowing how to read these is a useful skill.
Broomstick Crochet - Developed a long time ago and very popular during its time, it has since gained some popularity in modern times after having elapsed for many decades. It is a method of lace making, sometimes called broomstick lace or jiffy lace. It uses a regular crochet hook, but you hold the stitches on something like a broom handle.
Cro-hook Crochet - Using a single hook called a cro hook, it has a hook on both ends, creating double-sided crochet.

You can work stitches with either end, and there is no right or wrong side of the crochet piece. It creates a result similar to knitting and Tunisian crochet.

What is Tambouring?
Tambouring is French and is closely related to embroidery. The background fabric is stretched over, usually a wooden frame, and a needle with a hooked end is used to embroider on the background fabric.

Shepherd's weave generally requires a thicker, coarser yarn. By the 1800s, shepherd's weave was growing increasingly popular.

The following is a paragraph mentioning Shepherd's knitting from The Memoirs Of A Highland Lady by Elizabeth Grant written in 1812 and published in 1912:
What is Shepherd's Knitting?
Shepherd's knitting or slip stitch crochet came into being in the 1800s.

It uses a shepherd's hook, which has a strong tapered shape, and a hook on the thinner side. It looks like a shepherd's crook.

"Sometimes, when he was not well, he wore a plaid cloak and an evening cap, red or white, made by his hardworking wife in a stitch he called shepherd's knitting.

It was made with a little hook she fashioned for herself out of the tooth of an old tortoiseshell comb.

She used to go looping her home-spun wool as fast as her fingers could move, making not only caps, but drawers and vests for winter wear for the old husband she cared for."

There is evidence of shepherd's knitting was practiced in Estonia, the Balkans, Sweden, Iceland, Scotland and Romania.

There you have it, the history of crochet. Hopefully, this post satisfied your curiosity, and you discovered something interesting about this wonderful hobby.

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Tunisian Crochet
Crochet

Complete Guide To The Tunisian Crochet

What if I told you there is only one yarn art that combines crochet and knitting? Enter Tunisian crochet!

Guess what? With this crochet technique, you can make textiles that mimic knitting and fabrics that resemble crochet. You can also create completely different stitches with this technique.

Despite the name, there is no evidence that it originally came from Tunisia. People don't know much about this technique; that's like knitting. So where did it come from and what do we know about it?

Read on for more information in my guide to Tunisian crochet. What is Tunisian crochet?
Tunisian crochet (pronounced tyoo-ni-ni-zee-uhn crochet in the UK and Australia, and also-nee-zhn crochet in the US) is a type of needlework fusing knitting and crochet.

Knitters and crocheters alike will find something that reminds them of their craft in Tunisian crochet.

Learning this technique is great if you like the look of knitting but don't like using two knitting needles. Or, maybe you don't like some crochet, but you still like the look of it.

Since Tunisian crochet didn't come to Tunisia, where did it originally come from? No one knows, unfortunately.

The popularity of Tunisian crochet did not return until the 1960s, when it was introduced back into print.

People first saw Tunisian crochet appear in print in 1884 in a book called 'The Dictionary of Needlework.' During those years, Tunisian Crochet was becoming increasingly popular. However, soon after, it declined.


Tunisian Hook Kit (3.5mm)
Store at WeCrochet
What is the difference between Crochet and Tunisian crochet?
Here's a quick comparison between traditional crochet and Tunisian crochet.

#1 - Knitting
Tunisian crochet is quite stretchy. It also tends to curl more than regular crochet.

Regular crochet is exceptionally stretchy.

#2 - Tool
Tunisian crochet: In this crochet technique, you use a longer hook. The longest hooks are up to 14 inches long.

Traditional crochet: Regular crochet hooks are shorter than Tunisian hooks and tend to be about 6 inches long.

#3 - Method
Tunisian crochet: you work the stitches in two passes, the forward pass and the return pass.

Traditional crochet: flip the work at the end of the row.

Furls Odyssey Multi Hook Gift Sets

Add a random selection of 3, 5 or 8 Furls hooks to your cart, all at a discount when you purchase these hooks individually.
What is the difference between Tunisian and Afghan crochet?
Although they sound like two completely different crochet techniques, they are one and the same. Tunisian crochet is known as afghan crochet as well.

People used to call Tunisian crochet "Afghan crochet" or "Afghan stitch" before the 1970s, but now people interchange the two.

Afghan crochet is often confused with a different crochet method. But, it is a group of crochet stitches within the Tunisian technique.

Tunisian Crochet Feat Img
How to Tunisian crochet
First things first, let's start with the basics. Here is a list of things you will need.

Tunisian crochet hook. (The pattern you are using will tell you which one you need).
Yarn
Scissors
Tape measure or ruler
Darning needle for weaving in ends
Optional: Stitch counters or stitch markers.
As for what size hook you need, check the yarn label to see what it recommends.

Here are how to make some of the most common Tunisian stitches with some free crochet tutorials. A perfect introduction to expanding your stitch repertoire.

Stitch #2. The complete Tunisian crochet stitch.

Fluffy, chunky, warm ... what more could you ask for in a fabric? The warm characteristic of this stitch makes it an excellent choice for winter garments, such as scarves.

Another great thing is that the finished fabric has two different textures on each side; it is reversible.

Stitch #3. The Tunisian stitch of Tunisian crochet stitch.

Now, here's where you can be fooled! The Tunisian crochet stitch looks just like the knit stitch. As soon as you flip the seemingly "knitted" fabric over, you may see a difference if you compare it to an actual knitted piece.

Stitch #4. The Tunisian stitch Purl crochet Tunisian stitch.

Hmmm... Is this Tunisian crochet or knitting? Look closely and compare a knit and tunisian stitch, and you'll see a slight difference between the two.

This stitch is great if you don't like to knit, but want to make a purl stitch.

More types of tunisian crochet stitches:

Reverse stitch
Ocean Stitch
Everyone who does Tunisian crochet gets purled fabric, so don't worry if you think it's something you're doing wrong.

How do I stop my Tunisian crochet from curling?
Picture this: you've finished making a Tunisian crochet project, and you're so happy with it! But wait, is that a curl you see at the top? I know that feeling. Super annoying!
What is a tunisian crochet hook?
A Tunisian crochet hook is elongated, hooked at one end and capped at the other. Tunisian or 'Afghan' crochet hooks are ideal for holding lots of stitches. They are designed specifically for Tunisian crochet.

Good examples are Tunisian Trefoil hooks, Boye Tunisian hooks, Susan Bates' Afghan hooks and Addi's Tunisian hooks.

Can I use a regular crochet hook for Tunisian crochet?
Yes, you can use a regular crochet hook for Tunisian crochet, but only for small projects. The larger the project, the more difficult it will be to fit all the stitches on a regular crochet hook.

Tunisian crochet hooks are longer than traditional crochet hooks and have end caps. These features make it easier for the hook to hold more stitches.

Tunisian crochet patterns
Here are some recommendations to give you some inspiration and expand your crochet skills with some free Tunisian crochet patterns.

How to do it: Tunisian single crochet stitch
This Tunisian crochet stitch is the most basic of the stitches and is very easy to learn. (Abbreviated as Tss or also known as afghan stitch).

Learn how to do it in this video tutorial from B.Hhook Crochet.

If you prefer written instructions, read on to learn how to make a simple Tunisian stitch.

Begin the process as you would if you were doing regular crochet, with crochet chains (also known as a foundation row or foundation chain). Once you have made the foundation row, now start turning it into a tunisian stitch.

The simple tunisian stitch is made up of two parts, the forward pass and the backward pass. Remember to always keep the yarn behind the fabric.


Tunisian crochet in the round
Here is an excellent tutorial for working in the round with the simple stitch.

Tunisian crochet stitches
How many Tunisian crochet stitches are there?
There are over 400 Tunisian crochet stitches out there in total. Of course, you don't need all of them in your stitch repertoire, but here are the four most common Tunisian crochet stitches.

Stitch #1. The Simple stitch (also known as the afghan stitch) Tunisian crochet stitch.

The Tunisian single stitch makes a stretchy but almost opaque fabric. The wrong side has a bumpy texture and looks very similar to the knit stitch.
"Let's Get Cozy" Mug-Cozy by Kris Stone.

This free Tunisian crochet pattern is a simple and functional project that will show up in no time. A great project for beginners.

Tunisia Basketweave pillow crochet pattern by Tanya Eberhardt

Here's a free Tunisian crochet pattern for a pillowcase for something equally functional but a little more advanced.

A funny thing happened ... shawl by Amy Depew at The Laughing Willow

A pretty, chiffon shawl with loose, open stitches.

Flaming Gorge scarf by Hailey Redden.

When worn with a striped or multicolored scarf, the rich gradient complements the lovely stitchwork.

Tuwe by Christina Adorjan : Napster

Once you've made a few beginner patterns and have grown in your skills, try your hand at this wonderful open cropped bolero.

For more great Tunisian crochet patterns and projects, Ravelry is a great place to look.

Also, popular designer and creator Dora Ohrenstein has published a book through weaving in a modern, easy-to-access approach to Tunisian crochet.

With 30 Tunisian crochet stitches and 11 projects, this is a great introduction to this method.

The new Tunisian crochet: contemporary designs from time-honored traditions.

The new Tunisian crochet: contemporary designs from time honored traditions.
Click for more information / Buy on Amazon
Afghani Tunisian Crochet
Here are some great patterns for Tunisian crochet for Afghans and their tutorials.

Sweet gingham baby blanket video tutorial by TL Yarn Crafts.

Daydream: A Simple Striped Tunisian Crochet Blanket by a Woof Dog

Here are crochet designer and blogger Chiwei's video tutorial on how to do the simple stitch (the most common stitch in Tunisian crochet.)

Here is a related video tutorial on how to change colors in Tunisian crochet.

Honestly Easy Tunisian Crochet Afghani by AllFreeCrochet

A quick and easy weekend project, it uses bulky yarn of contrasting color, so it crochets very fast.

What is Tunisian crochet used for?
A lot of different things. You can make almost anything with Tunisian crochet. From socks to hats, shawls to knitted jackets.

Does Tunisian crochet use more yarn?
Compared to knitting, Tunisian crochet uses more yarn, along with traditional crochet.

Is Tunisian crochet difficult?
Not at all! You don't need any experience in knitting or standard crochet. So you can learn Tunisian style even if you have never used yarn and a hook or needle together.

Why is it called Tunisian crochet?
It is difficult to discern why this stitch is called Tunisian crochet since we don't know much about it. We know that people used to call it just Afghan crochet and later also called Tunisian crochet. Now you have all the tools and information you need to start a new Tunisian crochet project.

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Susan Bates Crochet Hooks Size Chart
Crochet

Everything You Need To Know About Susan Bates Crochet Hooks Size Chart

Susan Bates offers a wide variety of crochet hooks made of different materials, however not all sizes are available with every line.

This guide is to help you know which sizes come in which options.

Here, in this post, I have a handy conversion chart, image and downloadable PDF for easy reference whenever you need them. Crochet Hook Sizing
First, here is some helpful information about crochet hook sizing and conversion between the different sizing systems.

Generally there are three systems, metric (AUS/NZ), US and UK/Canada.

For more information, visit my post on crochet hook sizes here.

Susan Bates Crochet Hooks Size Chart.
Below are charts of the size and its equivalent in other systems of each line of crochet hooks Susan Bates sell.

Susan Bates Silvalume Crochet Hooks Chart
Silvalume is their main line, and is made of smooth anodized aluminum.

Size
Light Gold B-12.25mm
Light Pink C-2.75mm
Light Blue D-33.25mm
Light Peach E-43.50mm
Pink Gray F-53.75mm
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More Info
All rights reserved.
Green K-10.5 6.50 mm
All rights reserved.
Light gray Blue M-13 9.00 mm
Bronze Pink N-15 10.00 mm
Note: Colors are approximate and do not have an official name.

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Silvalume Crochet Hooks Size Chart PDF
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Susan Bates Afghani / Tunisian Crochet Hooks Chart
Long aluminum hooks designed for Tunisian or Afghan crochet, they are double or have a stopper at the end, rather like a knitting needle.

They are a variant on the Silvalume line, so they have the same size options, although much longer lengths.

Size
Light gold B-12.25mm
Light pink C-2.75mm
Light blue D-33.25mm
Light Peach E-43.50mm
Pink Gray F-53.75mm
More information about this product
All rights reserved.
More Info
All rights reserved.
Green K-10.5 6.50 mm
All rights reserved.
Light gray Blue M-13 9.00 mm
Bronze Pink N-15 10.00 mm
Note: Colors are approximate and do not have an official name.

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Afghan and Tunisian Crochet Hooks Size Chart PDF.
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Susan Bates ergonomic crochet hooks chart
Called Susan Bates soft ergonomic crochet hooks, these are your normal silvalume crochet hooks with a soft plastic handle. As a result, the same size options are available.

Size
Light Gold B-12.25mm
Light Pink C-2.75mm
Light Blue D-33.25mm
Light peach E-43.50mm

Pink Gray F-53.75mm
More information about this product
All rights reserved.
More information about this product
All rights reserved.
Green K-10.5 6.50 mm
All rights reserved.
Light gray Blue M-13 9.00 mm
Bronze Pink N-15 10.00 mm
Note: Colors are approximate and do not have an official name.

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Soft Ergonomic Crochet Crochet Hooks Size Chart PDF.
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Susan Bates Bamboo Crochet Crochet Hook Chart.
These have a comfortable bamboo handle and a head with Silvalume aluminum and color coding. Unfortunately, they are discontinuing this line, so some sizes may be hard to find.

Size
Light Gold B-12.25mm
Light Pink C-2.75mm
Light Blue D-33.25mm
Light Peach E-43.50mm
Pink Gray F-53.75mm
More information about this product
All rights reserved.
More Info
All rights reserved.
Green K-10.5 6.50 mm
All rights reserved.
Light gray Blue M-13 9.00 mm
Bronze Pink N-15 10.00 mm
Note: Colors are approximate and do not have an official name.

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Bamboo Handle Crochet Hooks Size Chart PDF.
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Susan Bates steel crochet hook chart.
The smallest crochet hooks, designed for making crochet lace. Susan Bates' steel hooks are called Steelite.

U.S. Metric
3.50 mm 00
2.55 mm 0
2.35 mm 1
2.25 mm2
2.10 mm 3
2 mm 4
1.90 mm 5
1.80 mm 6
1.65 mm 7
1.50 mm 8
1.40 mm 9
1.30 mm 10
1.10 mm 11
1 mm 12
0.85 mm 13
0.75 mm 14

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Steelite Crochet Hooks Sizing Chart PDF
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Susan Bates Quicksilver crochet crochet hooks chart
Similar to the Silvalume line in that they are made of aluminum, these are a plain gray and are not color coded. Slightly less slippery and more economical than the other range.

US Metric Size Size
B-12.25mm
C-22.75mm
D-33.25mm

E-43.50mm
F-53.75mm
G-6 4.00mm
H-85.00mm
I-95.50mm
J-106.00mm
K-10.5 6.50mm
L-118.00mm
M-139.00mm
N-1510.00mm

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Susan Bates Luxite Graphic Crochet Hooks
Made of lightweight plastic, these are affordable and have a slightly grippy pearlized finish. Good for beginners.

Metric Size NOS Size
2.25 mmB/1
2.75 mmC/2
3.125 mmD
3.25 mmD/3
3.5 mmE/4
3.75 mmF/5
4.00 mmG/6
4.25 mm G
4.50 mm US7
5.00 mmH/8
5.50 mmI/9
6.00 mmJ/10
6.50 mmK/10.5
8.00 mmL/11
9.00 mmM/13
10.00 mmN/15
11.50 mm P/16
15.75/16 mmQ
19 mmS

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Luxite Crochet Hooks Size Chart PDF
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Susan Bates Crystalite crochet hooks chart
Made of acrylic, (a type of plastic) these are smooth and brightly colored.

Size
Navy blue G-6 4.00 mm
All rights reserved.
All rights reserved.
Yellow J-10 6.00 mm
Green K-10.5 6.50 mm
Bright blue L-11 8.00 mm
Purple BlueM-13.
Light blue N-15.10.00mm
All rights reserved.
Note: Colors are approximate and do not have an official name.

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Crystalite Crochet Hooks Size Chart PDF
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Best Crochet Books
Crochet

The Best Crochet Books You Need

Crochet books, inspiration, a guide, reference book and practical! Crochet books are also good for inspiration. Here are the best crochet books and best crochet books for beginners.

A wonderful resource for any crocheter's library.

Here are 30 of the best crochet books and crochet magazines. What is the best book to learn Crochet?
Learn to Crochet, Love to Crochet By Anna Wilkinson
Over 20 crochet accessories and garments for you and your friends.

A crochet book with over 20 projects, a wonderful book to help you choose your first project. The first ten focus on how to crochet for beginners.

The second ten focus on expanding your knowledge and creating a fantastic handmade closet.

What is the best crochet book for beginners?

Learn to Crochet, Love to Crochet By Anna Wilkinson.

Anna Wilkinson is a knitwear and crochet designer who has worked for several high profile fashion houses and the author of other crochet books.

Learn to crochet, love to crochet by Anna Wilkinson.
Click for more information / Buy on Amazon
The best general books for crochet.
The Crochet Answer Book, 2nd edition by Edie Eckman.
Solutions to all the problems you'll face; Answers to all the questions you'll ask.

A perfect reference book for almost every problem you may encounter on your crochet journey.

Edie Eckman is a teacher, designer, and author of several useful crochet books and others on other crafts.

The Crochet Answer Book, 2nd Edition: Solutions to all the problems you'll face; Answers to all the questions you'll ask By Edie Eckman.
Click for more information / Buy on Amazon.
Hooked on Crochet by Ruth Maddock
Written for absolute beginner crocheters, she guides you through your first stitch on your crochet needle to more complicated garments and items. Lots of visual guides, simple instructions, tips and hacks in this crochet book.

Ruth Maddock is a designer trained in the fashion industry. She mixes classic and modern takes in her designs.

Crochet crochet by Ruth Maddock
Click for more information / Buy on Amazon.
Stitch 'N Bitch Crochet: The Happy Hooker by Debbie Stoller
One of the best crochet books for a modern audience who are afraid to pick up this craft because 'grannies do it.' This book liberates myths and stereotypes while learning a wonderful hobby.

Debbie Stoller is the bestselling author of crochet and other books in the Stitch & Bitch series.

Stitch 'N Bitch Crochet: The Happy Hooker by Debbie Stoller
Click for more information / Buy on Amazon
How to Crochet by Pauline Turner
The definitive crochet course, complete with step-by-step techniques, stitch libraries, and projects for your home and family.

A definitive guide with lots of detail on every aspect you could possibly want to know. Sections devoted to different types of the hobby, plus information on its origins. Very interesting.

Pauline Turner is the writer of several excellent resource books on a variety of crafts.

How to Crochet: The Ultimate Crochet Course, Complete with step-by-step techniques, Stitch Libraries and projects for your home and family.
Click for more information / Buy on Amazon
A to Z of Crochet by Martingale
The ultimate guide for the beginner to advanced Crocheter.

A focus on techniques, stitches, binding off errors, and problems for all skill levels. A definitive guide!

A to Z of Crochet: The Ultimate Guide for the Beginner to Advanced Crocheter
Click for more information / Buy on Amazon
Crochet Stitch Dictionary by Sarah Hazell
200 essential stitches with step-by-step photos
A wonderful place to start on your stitch learning journey. Divided into sections to make it easier and organized by level of difficulty, a library in a crochet book.

Sarah Hazell writes many useful reference libraries and resources like this one.

Crochet Stitch Dictionary: 200 Essential Stitches with step-by-step photos by Sarah Hazell.
Click for more information / Buy on Amazon
Crocheting in Plain English by Maggie Righetti
The only book any Crocheter will ever need.

She makes a bold claim with the title, but it's true. A comprehensive resource on everything for learning to crochet.

From the basics to caring for your crocheted items, it has a lot of information without being overwhelming.

Maggie Righetti is an instructor, teacher and author who has been an expert in her field for many years.

Crocheting in Plain English: The Only Book Any Crocheter Will Ever Need by Maggie Righetti
Click for more information / Buy on Amazon
Simple Crocheting by Erika Knight
A complete how to crochet workshop with 20 Projects.

A workshop in a crochet book, what an excellent idea! Take it at your own pace, and Erika hasn't forgotten a thing. Take on gorgeous projects with ease while challenging yourself and learning.

Erika Knight creates workshops and references based on simple, easy to understand principles.

Simple Crochet: A Complete How to Crochet Workshop with 20 Projects by Erika Knight
Click for more information / Buy on Amazon
Crochetterie By Molla Mills
Cool contemporary crochet for the creative mind.

Although the title is a mouthful, it's true! Create stylish and functional garments, accessories and items for those around you and your home while growing your skill set.

Molla Mills is a Finnish blogger and designer focused on modern, contemporary and functional creations.

Crochetterie: Fresh contemporary crochet for the creative mind by Molla Mills.
Click for more information / Buy on Amazon
Step-by-Step Crochet by Sally Harding
Learn from the basics to more complicated projects with simple steps and excellent visual procedures. Over 100 stitches and techniques are included, with a simple guide to reading patterns. Plus, much more.

Sally Harding has published many crochet pattern books.

Step-by-Step Crochet by Sally Harding
Click for more information / Buy on Amazon
Calamity-Free Crochet By Catherine Hirst
Troubleshooting tips and advice for Savvy Needlecrafter.

Think of this as a manual for every time something goes wrong or you run into a problem. Just like your expert friend who can help you solve your problems, but it lives on your bookshelf or e-reader.

The author creates wonderful crochet books by bringing classic and timeless elements of crafts with a modern twist.

Calamity-Free Crochet: Troubleshooting Tips and Advice for the Savvy Needlecrafter By Catherine Hirst
Click for more information / Buy on Amazon.
Modern Crochet by Molla Mills
Crochet accessories and projects for your home.

Create great decor and functional items for your home, plus gift ideas, accessories and many more. Stunning photography and colorful patterns.

Molla Mills is a Finnish blogger and designer focusing on modern, contemporary and functional creations.

Modern Crochet: Crochet accessories and projects for your home by Molla Mills.
Click to learn more / Buy from Amazon
Crochet Your Way By Susan Levin & Gloria Jensma
A guide to developing your skills and individual style, leading to the creation of an original afghan you can wear. Plus, more than 20 projects to try.

Susan Levin and Gloria Jensma are instructors and designers who teamed up to create this excellent publication.

Crochet Your Own Way By Susan Levin and Gloria Jensma
Click for more information / Buy on Amazon
150 Favorite Crochet Designs by Mary Carolyn Waldrep
Published by Dover Publications, a journey through the history of crochet as much as a collection of designs to try. Featuring the best designs from the late 19th century to the present day.

Mary Carolyn Waldrep has written many books on crochet and others on arts and crafts, from embroidery to scrapbooking.

150 Favorite Crochet Patterns by Mary Carolyn Waldrep
Click for more information / Buy on Amazon
The best Amigurumi crochet books.
Edward's City of Beasts By Kerry Lord
More than 40 soft and comfortably toy Animal Crochet.

Filled with colorful and adorable characters just waiting to be made. A perfect selection of stuffed toys or animals you can make for the little ones in your life or for yourself! Be careful, it gets addictive fast!

Kerry Lord is a designer and owner of the British alpaca store TOFT.

Kerry's son Edward inspired the Edward's Menagerie series when he decided to make an elephant for himself.

Edward's Menagerie: Over 40 Soft and Comfortable Animal Crochet Toy by Kerry Lord
Click for more information / Buy on Amazon
Unicorns, dragons and more fantasy Amigurumi 2: Bring 14 charming characters to life! By Vermeiren Joke
Amigurumi with a particular focus, fantasy and fantastical creatures. Some examples include fairies, unicorns, dragons and more. Create a fantasy wonderland full of intriguing creatures.

Joke Vermeiren specializes in amigurumi (usually made with worsted weight yarn) for imaginary and real creatures and animals, having published many crochet books on the subject.

Unicorns, dragons and more fantasy Amigurumi 2: Bring 14 charming characters to life! By Vermeiren Joke
Click for more information / Buy on Amazon
My Crochet Doll By Isabelle Kessedjian
A fabulous crochet doll pattern with over 50 cute crochet doll clothes and accessories.

For someone who dreamed of having a doll growing up, but didn't like the Barbie look. Starts as a basic pattern for the toy itself, then over 50 designs for clothing and accessories.

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best crochet
Crochet

Best Crochet Blogs, Websites, and Bloggers

Crochetverse by Stephanie Pokorny : Napster
Stephanie Pokorny of Crochetverse
About: Crochetverse. A crochet universe, imagine that! What's not to love? Well, Crochetverse is not exactly that, but it is a website full of information and tips.

Crochetverse
What we love: tips, tutorials, patterns and more abound here! The problem is knowing where to start reading!
Find Crochetverse On Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Pinterest | YouTube

Lynda's Crochet Australia : Napster
About: This is an online store selling information and a wide range of books, hooks, yarns and supplies.

Crochet Australia
What we love: The tutorials and tips are helpful.

Find Crochet Australia on Facebook

Lyns Crafts by Marily Smith
Lyns Crafts Logo
About: Marily Smith is the creator of the Lyn's Crafts craft store Lyn's Crafts. She is originally from the Philippines, and creating crochet patterns for Lyn's Crafts is her full-time job. She wouldn't have it any other way.

Lyn's Crafts
What we love: they share great free patterns! But a real highlight of the blog is the helpful tutorials and crochet information. There is a wealth of knowledge that is sure to come in handy.

Find Lyns' crafts on Facebook | Twitter | Pinterest.

Knitting and crochet by Mike and Amy
Knitting and Crochet by Mike and Amy
About: Knitting & Crochet is run by wife and husband team Amy & Mike. Amy is the in-house crafting expert, and Mike loves technology and photography. They both love sailing, travel and sustainability.

Knitting and crochet.
What we love: Packed with information and patterns, which are created by Amy with incredible skill and detail. One feature we love is that they teach you how to make specific crochet stitches. Something that would be very helpful!

Mei's AmiguruMEI : Napster
Mei from AmiguruMEI
About: Mei is a Japanese woman who loves to crochet Amigurumi, which is where the name of her blog, amiguruMEI, came from. We think the name is brilliant.

AmiguruMEI
What we love: amiguruMEI has a nice, clean look, and the photos are gorgeous. She is generous in the fact that she posts many patterns for free that must have taken her hours to make!

Find amiguruMEI on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram.

Vintage crochet by Amy
About: Amy has always been knitting, ever since she was a little girl. She was taught how to do it by her aunt, and she never stopped creating. Amy has a degree in textile design and has been a fabric designer for many years.

Yarnspirations
What we love: They post very frequently, and there is helpful and fun content to look forward to in their blog posts.

Find Yarnspirations On Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Pinterest | YouTube.

Berroco
Berroco Logo
About: Berroco Inc. is a yarn dyeing, manufacturing and design studio based in Uxbridge, Massachusetts. This is their blog where you can get a behind the scenes look at their processes, and much more.

Berroco
What we love: They post great articles containing free patterns, Q&A with makers, helpful tutorials, and more. A great site if you're wondering how to make yarn used for crochet!

Find Berroco On Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Pinterest | YouTube.

Julie's ACCROchet : Napster
Julie from ACCROchet
About: Julie Desjardins is a French-Canadian crochet designer who loves all things crochet and creative. The name of her blog, ACCROchet, comes from the French word "accro" which means addicted. So it implies crochet addict!

Repeat Crafter Me
What we love: Sarah's patterns are inspiring and colorful. There are some great ideas for vacations and gorgeous ideas for kids to wear and accessorize. Another one of the gorgeous crochet blogs around.

Quality Crochet Yarns
Check out all the beautiful yarns for your next crochet project.
A Boy and Bunting by Matt
Matt from Boy and Bunting
About: Matt loves creating beautiful colorful crochet designs and crafts. He started blogging in 2011 with his first crochet and craft blog according to Matt. He now regularly features his craft projects on this site.

The good news is that he sifted through his most popular posts on his old site and has them on A Boy and Bunting.

TL Yarn Crafts by Toni
Toni from TL Yarn Crafts
About: Toni started her blog in 2013 as a way to share her knowledge about all things crochet. Her passion led her to design her own patterns. More recently she started a podcast.

TL Yarn Crafts.
What we love: Toni's designs are lovely. You should definitely check out her crochet A Longs, tutorials and her podcast. I love her pattern: the Veronica Cocoon Cardi, an oversized blanket sweater.
Petals To Picots by Kara : Napster
Kara from Petals to Picots
About: Kara's love of crochet began when she was little and would sit and watch her grandmother crochet beautiful afghans, tablecloths, baby clothes, and so much more.

When she was nine years old, her grandmother gave Kara her hook on her own, which she still has now, finished 30 years later, she has been crocheting ever since.

From trying new patterns to designing her own, Kara always has a crochet project tucked away in her purse.

Petals to Picots
What we love: There are some great patterns, tips and tricks to be found on Kara's site. If you are wanting to learn more about Tunisian crochet, there are some great tutorials.

Make more for less Compare and save Learn more at We Crochet.
LEARN MORE AT WE CROCHET
Honey Hope by Olivia Kent
Olivia Kent of Honey Hope
About: Honey Hope by Olivia is where makers come together to make fresh crochet again and to change the world one stitch at a time.

As a crochet clothing company with a modern approach to a timeless art form, they are big proponents of the slow fashion movement. They believe that fashion should be made with love and in a sustainable way.

Hopeful Honey
What we love: There are some gorgeous patterns to try, such as ponchos, sun hats, backpacks and sweaters. Olivia also offers easy-to-follow tutorials for different techniques.

What we love: Julie loves to make modern and colorful crochet patterns. Her site has product reviews and helpful books, as well as offering crochet workshops.

Emma Varnam
Emma Varnam from Emma Varnams blog.
About: A successful knit and crochet designer with over ten years in her field, Emma Varnam loves to make. She says she can't sit down without a crochet hook or knitting needles in her hands!

Emma loves to share her journey of making.

Welcome to the eTendering eTendering Portal.
What we love: Emma has created several books on crochet, all with positive reviews. She also has several helpful video tutorials. Her writing style and blog posts are a joy to read.

Fiber Flux by Jennifer Dickerson
Jennifer Dickerson of Fiber Flux
About: FiberFlux, a site about all things "Stichy" belongs to Jennifer, a knitter and crocheter. She has a background in fine art, having been a painter for several years.

Fiber Flow
What We Love: An excellent blog for all things fiber arts, she regularly posts exclusive and excellent tutorials for easy crafts. The pattern roundups she releases are also helpful.

Find Fiber Flux On Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Pinterest | YouTube.

Maya Kuzman's Little Treasures
Maya Kuzman of The Little Treasures.
About: Maya Kuzman is a textile pattern and crochet designer who loves all things bohemian. She loves being creative and sharing her work, and always turns out amazing pieces.

Little Treasures.
What we love: As mentioned above, she is extremely creative and talented at what she does. Mixing vintage styles with a bohemian twist makes for some fantastic creations.


Look what I made by Dedri
Dedri of Look What I Made
About: It may come as a surprise, but Dedri of Look What I Made wasn't always the very enthusiastic crocheter that she is.

She used to be passionate about baking. Dedri sometimes still bakes, but her days are consumed by one fantastic project after another.

Check out what I made
What we love: A highlight of her blog is where she highlights talented creators and patterns. Many have said her newsletter is excellent and full of all kinds of goodies. Many of our reader's best crochet blogs.

Find Look What I Made On Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Pinterest

My recycled bags by Cindy
My recycled bags logo
About: Cindy, or RecycleCindy as she is known on her blog, was always excited about helping the environment and crochet. In 2008, she decided to create My Recycled Bags, combining both loves.

My Recycled Bags
As I was compiling this list, it was so hard not to get distracted! So many talented creators, great designs and enough inspiration to last a lifetime!

Lots of resources to help me get started on my crochet journey. Feel free to follow What We Love: Tamara's crochet patterns are adorable. She writes patterns for shawls, hats and baby sweaters. There is a library of crochet tutorials in both video and image form to help you with techniques.

One of my favorite crochet blogs.

Repeat Crafter Me by Sarah Zimmerman
Sarah Zimmerman of Repeat Crafter Me
About: Sarah has always been crafty and has had a love for art, crafting and creating. In 2011 she taught herself to crochet and seemed to have unleashed a hidden talent.

She quickly began designing pieces and writing patterns.

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crochet starter guide
Crochet

The Crochet Starter Guide Every Beginner Needs

Think of a crochet starter kit as a one-stop box of everything you need to kickstart learning to crochet.

Thinking about starting crochet, or ready to dive right into this enjoyable hobby? Welcome I warmly join you on this crochet journey, as I am still learning and practicing every day.
Here are crochet kits for beginners, perfect for learning how to make the creation of your dreams. What is a Crochet Kit?
A kit is a collection of items all packaged together designed for a specific purpose or project. They are convenient because instead of making a list of everything you need, it comes ready in a package for one price.
So a crochet kit has all the equipment needed for a specific crochet project and helps you learn to crochet.

There are a few types of crochet kits.
Some are single project kits, as in they have all the elements included for a crochet item and nothing else. Some of these types include yarn, and some do not.
Some are beginner crochet kits, as they have everything you need to start crocheting. They may or may not include yarn, and most have an instruction booklet with several different projects for you to try.
An amigurumi kit includes everything to make one or more amigurumi creations. They almost always have yarn. These are not the best choice for beginners, though, as they are pretty complicated crocheted things.
New tools from The Hook Nook. An assortment of Hook Nook tools and hooks on a blue background.

Why should you get Crochet Starter Kits for beginners?
Crochet starter kits are perfect for beginners because of the following reasons.

Convenience - Everything you need comes in one package, ready to go.
Time saving - No need to spend hours searching online for each product. Just find the one you want, and you're good to go!
Value - Bang for your investment as all products come under one price, and sometimes you won't be able to find things in kits anywhere else.
Affordability - Since everything is all together, you save money buying a bundle than everything separately. Plus, shipping is cheaper the fewer items you have in your cart.
Educational - Get out of your comfort zone, learn something new and gain more confidence in your crochet skills and crochet stitch repertoire.
Easy - Not too difficult, but just that right combination of familiar, enjoyable, and a little challenging.
Helpful - Detailed, easy-to-follow instructions are included to guide you from your first stitch to right to cast off.
Regardless of skill level, a beginner's kit is still useful for advanced crocheters if you want to relax with an easier project. Without having to worry about what you buy beforehand!

Crochet Starter Kits - Your Questions Answered
What is the best size crochet hook for beginners?
The best size crochet hook for beginners is size 5.0mm. It is large enough to hold comfortably but small enough not to be cumbersome. It creates stitches easily, and it's not too complicated to get your hook in either.

What does it take to get started crocheting?
Here's a checklist.

Yarn
A crochet hook or more than one - (if the pattern requires different/multiple hook sizes)
Tapestry Needle - (to weave in the ends)
Scissors - (to cut the yarn if needed)
A pattern or project idea - (after all, you need a plan to create!)
Creativity!
What are the best crochet hooks?
The best crochet hooks for when you are just starting out are aluminum crochet hooks, size 5.0mm. It's flexible for a wide range of projects, easy to grip and use, and the stitches you create with it are just the right size to practice with.
Not only that, but they are also very affordable. Perfect for beginners!

Which is better to knit or crochet?
It depends on your preference. Both are equally excellent, fun and satisfying crafts. But for a true beginner, in terms of which is easier, crochet is better. Much simpler and quicker to learn than knitting.

I've written a post about the differences, benefits, and similarities between knitting and crochet. Read crochet vs knitting here.
Things to consider in the best crochet starter kit.
Does it include one or more crochet hooks?
These, along with yarn, are the most necessary materials for crocheting! Make sure they are included in the kit. Sometimes another size will be needed for different parts of the creation, so check to make sure they are in the kit.

Do you have yarn?
Not all crochet kits have balls of yarn. Often you will have to buy it separately. This is good if you want to choose for yourself, but not so good in terms of convenience.

If it does have it, it will generally be more expensive than those that don't. Decide what works best for you.

What about a tapestry needle?
A tapestry needle is a small needle with a large eye (the hole you put the thread through). It's for sewing crocheted pieces together and weaving the ends in. (It is also called a yarn needle or a darning needle).

A beneficial tool that is often forgotten about until the moment you need it - make sure your beginner crochet kit has one of these!

(Don't forget to make sure the yarn will fit the needle. You don't want to have a thick weight yarn only to have the needle be too small).

Don't forget the stitch markers!
Nifty little tools to help you keep track of pattern and stitch changes. A stitch counter generally looks similar to safety pins. Yes, you can use a scrap piece of yarn if they are not included.

But it's nice to have a set of stitch markers that stand out against whatever yarn you are working on.

Is that a tape measure in the contents?
This is important! Before you begin any project, you should start with the basics. Make a sample to test your gauge and see if it is correct according to the instructions. A tape measure helps you make sure it is the right size.

What kind of accessories are included?
Pay close attention to the list of contents, so you have an idea of what is in the kit. The basics include all the items mentioned above, such as the instruction booklet with projects and patterns for beginners.

Other things are not essential, but good to have.

Are the instructions included and are they clear to understand?
An instruction manual or instruction book, if there are several projects, is essential. Read customer reviews and look at previews of items to see if the instructions are clear and easy to understand.

Sometimes, beginner crochet kits' content might only be for one creation, but they will include bonus projects.

Is there an individual guarantee on each of the items?
Sometimes things in a kit will be in excellent working order, but one item doesn't work, unfortunately. Read the warranty policy to see if you can replace that item or if you have to replace the whole thing.

What about the return policy?
In the unlikely event of a product mishap, you don't want a complicated and unfair policy that prevents you from enjoying the crochet kit!

Is the price worth the value of the kit?
If you are on a budget, one money saving tip is to evaluate all the products included in a kit, and add up the price of all of them separately, and compare. It will tell you which is cheaper, but in general, a kit is more reasonable.

I don't want to blow your budget in your quest to learn to crochet.

The Best Crochet Starter Kit
Here are some suggestions for getting started in this fabulous craft.

Crochet kit with bow ear warmer
Darn Nice Yarn Ear Warmer Crochet Kit
Get the best of both worlds with this traditional yet contemporary Bow Earwarmer Crochet Kit. Each kit comes with 1 skein of speckled Tweed and a digital pattern download.

Downloadable Digital Pattern
Ideal for beginners, as it only requires simple stitches.
Disadvantage

If you prefer a paper pattern, you would have to print it yourself Crochet Learn to crochet Kit dishcloth Bloom
We Crochet Learn to Crochet Kit dishcloth bloom
Kitchen towels are a lovely functional and practical project to learn to crochet. Once you've made one, you'll be eager to make more.

Kit includes:

Learn To Crochet Club: the dishcloth, beginner's instruction booklet.
3 balls of Dishie yarn (1 each in Azure, Begonia and Sunshine Multi)
U.S. size J-10 (6 mm) Caspian crochet hook needle
a yarn needle
Pro

Includes everything needed to complete a crocheted dishcloth.
Fun and bright colors
Disadvantage

Only comes in the colors listed Beginner Crochet Kit - Towelette
Beginner Crochet Kit - Towelette
Kitchen towels make great gifts, and once you learn the basics, you can try all kinds of different patterns.

This starter kit includes the pattern in a DIGITAL VERSION ONLY that you can print out or use online, the hook and cotton yarn you'll need to make your project, and all the videos you'll need to watch and learn.

(All videos and pattern will be sent in an email digitally after purchase) The hook and yarn will be mailed.

Pro

Simple stitch to learn and master
Cons

Very limited choice of yarn color Learn To Crochet Kit for both children and adults
Autumn Acorn Learn To Crochet Kit for Kids and Adults
A lovely gift for yourself to start your crochet journey or for someone else who would love to have a go at crochet.

Included in the kit - approx. 1 mini-skein (20 grams/80 yards) or 2 mini-skeins (10 grams/40 yards each) colors will vary -
One wooden crochet hook
A wooden acorn
A fun progress keeper
A yarn needle
How-to instructions
Easy to carry drawstring bag!
Pro

Great for kids or adults
Cons

You can't choose your colors, but you can choose girl or boy and boy or adult at checkout.

Get Hooked Learn to Crochet Kit
Nomad Yarns Get Hooked Learn to Crochet Kit
Nomad Yarn instructions take you from the beginning of the crochet chain through more intricate stitches to create an attractive sample to show off your new skills.

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crochet kit
Crochet

A Guide To Getting Your First Crochet Starter Kit

Here are crochet kits for beginners, perfect for learning how to make the creation of your dreams.What is a Crochet Kit?

A kit is a collection of items all packaged together designed for a specific purpose or project. They are convenient because instead of making a list of everything you need, it comes ready in a package for one price.

Think of a crochet starter kit as a one-stop box of everything you need to kickstart learning to crochet.

Thinking about starting crochet, or ready to dive right into this enjoyable hobby? Welcome I warmly join you on this crochet journey, as I am still learning and practicing every day.

So a crochet kit has all the equipment needed for a specific crochet project and helps you learn to crochet.

There are a few types of crochet kits.

Some are single project kits, as in they have all the elements included for a crochet item and nothing else. Some of these types include yarn, and some do not.

Some are beginner crochet kits, as they have everything you need to start crocheting. They may or may not include yarn, and most have an instruction booklet with several different projects for you to try.

An amigurumi kit includes everything to make one or more amigurumi creations. They almost always have yarn. These are not the best choice for beginners, though, as they are pretty complicated crocheted things.

New tools from The Hook Nook. An assortment of Hook Nook tools and hooks on a blue background.

Why should you get Crochet Starter Kits for beginners?

Crochet starter kits are perfect for beginners because of the following reasons.

Convenience - Everything you need comes in one package, ready to go.

Time saving - No need to spend hours searching online for each product. Just find the one you want, and you're good to go!

Value - Bang for your investment as all products come under one price, and sometimes you won't be able to find things in kits anywhere else.

Affordability - Since everything is all together, you save money buying a bundle than everything separately. Plus, shipping is cheaper the fewer items you have in your cart.

Educational - Get out of your comfort zone, learn something new and gain more confidence in your crochet skills and crochet stitch repertoire.

Easy - Not too difficult, but just that right combination of familiar, enjoyable, and a little challenging.

Helpful - Detailed, easy-to-follow instructions are included to guide you from your first stitch to right to cast off.

Regardless of skill level, a beginner's kit is still useful for advanced crocheters if you want to relax with an easier project. Without having to worry about what you buy beforehand!

Crochet Starter Kits - Your Questions Answered

What is the best size crochet hook for beginners?

The best size crochet hook for beginners is size 5.0mm. It is large enough to hold comfortably but small enough not to be cumbersome. It creates stitches easily, and it's not too complicated to get your hook in either.

What does it take to get started crocheting?

Here's a checklist.

Yarn

A crochet hook or more than one - (if the pattern requires different/multiple hook sizes)

Tapestry Needle - (to weave in the ends)

Scissors - (to cut the yarn if needed)

A pattern or project idea - (after all, you need a plan to create!)

Creativity!

What are the best crochet hooks?

The best crochet hooks for when you are just starting out are aluminum crochet hooks, size 5.0mm. It's flexible for a wide range of projects, easy to grip and use, and the stitches you create with it are just the right size to practice with.

Not only that, but they are also very affordable. Perfect for beginners!

Which is better to knit or crochet?

It depends on your preference. Both are equally excellent, fun and satisfying crafts. But for a true beginner, in terms of which is easier, crochet is better. Much simpler and quicker to learn than knitting.

I've written a post about the differences, benefits, and similarities between knitting and crochet. Read crochet vs knitting here.

Things to consider in the best crochet starter kit.

Does it include one or more crochet hooks?

These, along with yarn, are the most necessary materials for crocheting! Make sure they are included in the kit. Sometimes a different size will be needed for different parts of the creation, so check to make sure they are in the kit.

Do you have yarn?

Not all crochet kits have balls of yarn. Often you will have to buy it separately. This is good if you want to choose for yourself, but not so good in terms of convenience.

If it does have it, it will generally be more expensive than those that don't. Decide what works best for you.

What about a tapestry needle?

A tapestry needle is a small needle with a large eye (the hole you put the thread through). It's for sewing crocheted pieces together and weaving the ends in. (It is also called a yarn needle or a darning needle).

A beneficial tool that is often forgotten about until the moment you need it - make sure your beginner crochet kit has one of these!

(Don't forget to make sure the yarn will fit the needle. You don't want to have a thick weight yarn only to have the needle be too small).

Don't forget the stitch markers!

Nifty little tools to help you keep track of pattern and stitch changes. A stitch counter generally looks similar to safety pins. Yes, you can use a scrap piece of yarn if they are not included.

But it's nice to have a set of stitch markers that stand out against whatever yarn you are working on.

Is that a tape measure in the contents?

This is important! Before you begin any project, you should start with the basics. Make a sample to test your gauge and see if it is correct according to the instructions. A tape measure helps you make sure it is the right size.

What kind of accessories are included?

Pay close attention to the list of contents, so you have an idea of what is in the kit. The basics include all the items mentioned above, such as the instruction booklet with projects and patterns for beginners.

Other things are not essential, but good to have.

Are the instructions included and are they clear to understand?

An instruction manual or instruction book, if there are several projects, is essential. Read customer reviews and look at previews of items to see if the instructions are clear and easy to understand.

Sometimes, beginner crochet kits' content might only be for one creation, but they will include bonus projects.

Is there an individual guarantee on each of the items?

Sometimes things in a kit will be in excellent working order, but one item doesn't work, unfortunately. Read the warranty policy to see if you can replace that item or if you have to replace the whole thing.

What about the return policy?

In the unlikely event of a product mishap, you don't want a complicated and unfair policy that prevents you from enjoying the crochet kit!

Is the price worth the value of the kit?

If you are on a budget, one money saving tip is to evaluate all the products included in a kit, and add up the price of all of them separately, and compare. It will tell you which is cheaper, but in general, a kit is more reasonable.

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